Tag Archives: safety

Keep your family safer: get rid of unwanted hazardous products

 

You can’t watch children all the time.  So how can you keep them safer?ChildReachingCupboard

If you have unwanted hazardous products you could get them out of your home and away from curious hands.

How can you tell which products under the sink or in the closet are hazardous?

Look on the label.  If you see the words DANGER or POISON, that means the product is very harmful.

If you see the words CAUTION or WARNING, that means the products is somewhat harmful.

And if you don’t see CAUTION, WARNING, DANGER OR POISON on the product label, that means the product is safer to use.

So if you want to get rid of hazardous products you don’t want, what do you do?

Getting rid of hazardous products you no longer use can help keep you and your family safer.

Two free workshops on Chemical Safety in Schools in early December

Dave Waddell in the lab

You and your colleagues are invited to attend to attend two free workshops on Chemical Safety in Schools:

Initial Chemical Hygiene Training

Tuesday, December 2, from 8:30 -11:30 am

South Seattle College

6000 16th Avenue SW, Seattle, WA 98106

Advanced Hygiene/Spill Response Training

Thursday, December 4, from 1:15 – 4:30 pm

Center School (at Seattle Center)

305 Harrison St. Seattle, WA 98109

Dave Waddell’s presentations are highly visual and entertaining. He is a school chemical safety expert and developer of the on-line School Chemicals Database.

You will:

  • Learn proper chemical storage and handling techniques.
  • See spill response procedures.
  • Understand how to dispose laboratory wastes.
  • Hear about mandatory upcoming chemical hazard trainings.
  • Practice identifying chemicals of concern.
  • Get to ask your questions.

Register now by emailing the following information to dave.waddell@kingcounty.gov

  • Your name
  • Your school
  • Your position
  • Let Dave know if you are interested in clock hours.

Businesses: Prepare for Floods

Even if your business is not in a flood zone, it could still be flooded.  And business owners are liable for any contamination and clean-up caused by their hazardous products or wastes. Where to start?  Reduce the number of chemical products you store and safely dispose of your unwanted hazardous products and wastes.  If your business is in King County, these free services can help with that:

  • Call to schedule a free on-site visit to help you evaluate your business process and the wastes you generate.  206-263-8899 or toll free at 1-800-325-6165, ext. 3-8899
  • Find out if you qualify to dispose of wastes through the Local Hazardous Waste facilities and the Wastemobile
  • Not sure if a product or waste you have is hazardous? Call our Business Waste line at 206-296-3976.
  • Receive 50% or up to $500 of costs to manage, dispose, reduce or recycle hazardous wastes.

More safety tips for Businesses are at our website.  If you have friends who don’t have access to the web and could benefit from printed information, download this flyer for them.

Free Healthy Nail Salon Training

Does your favorite King County nail salon create a safe environment for you and their employees? The Healthy Nail Salons Project is providing a free training on how to create a healthy and safe nail salon on November 4th.  Print This Flyer and share it with your salon technicians. The training is free, and it is in both Vietnamese and English.

Sun Safety Tips for Infants

Sun Safety Tips for Infants

The FDA recommends that you not use sunscreen on infants 6 months and younger. Why? Their thinner skin will absorb more of the active chemical ingredients, plus their lower body weight and smaller size makes them more vulnerable to the chemicals in sunscreens.  Here are FDA’s sun safety tips for infants:

  • Keep your baby in the shade as much as possible. If you do use a small amount of sunscreen on yoru baby, don’t assume the child is well protected.
  • Make sure your child wears clothing that covers and protects sensitive skin. Use common sense; if you hold the fabric against your hand and it’s so sheer that you can see through it, it probably doesn’t offer enough protection.
  • Make sure your baby wears a hat that provides sufficient shade at all times.
  • Watch your baby carefully to make sure he or she doesn’t show warning signs of sunburn or dehydration. These include fussiness, redness and excessive crying.
  • Hydrate! Give your baby formula, breast milk, or a small amount of water between feedings if you’re out in the sun for more than a few minutes. Don’t forget to use a cooler to store the liquids.
  • Take note of how much your baby is urinating. If it’s less than usual, it may be a sign of dehydration, and that more fluids are needed until the flow is back to normal.
  • Avoid sunscreens containing the insect repellant DEET on infants, particularly on their hands. Young children may lick their hands or put them in their mouths. According to AAP, DEET should not be used on infants less than 2 months old.
  • If you do notice your baby is becoming sunburned, get out of the sun right away and apply cold compresses to the affected areas.

For more information, go to www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm309136.htm

Kids and chemicals don’t mix

Keep kids safe this summer by properly storing hazardous household products

Children are naturally curious and explore their homes where many hazardous but common household products are kept. The third most-common call to the Washington Poison Center is about accidental exposure to cleaning products.  

“Even the best parent can’t supervise a child all the time and easy-to-do prevention can make your home a safe place for your child to explore,” said Dr. Beth Ebel, director of Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Washington. 

The Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County has assembled easy tips for a safer home this summer. Find the complete list at www.hazwastehelp.org/hazardsinyourhome

Top safety tips include: 

  • Store products safely. Lock cabinets, or take a new look at where you keep cleaners, air fresheners, or medicines.
  • Keep hazardous products in their original containers. The labels have the product information on them, the hazards and first aid – all of this is critical information if your child is exposed to products. Even adults can mistake toxics for food if cleaning products, automotive fluids or other hazardous items are not stored in their original containers.
  • Get rid of unwanted hazardous products at no charge. Disposal is free at household hazardous waste disposal facilities, including the Wastemobile. A list of locations is at http://www.hazwastehelp.org.
  • Clean out your medicine cabinet and store medicines safely. Safely dispose of medicines that are unwanted or expired – use a no cost medicine take-back program at a drop-off location. Store medicines safely by keeping them out of reach – lock them in a drawer, cabinet or medicine lock box. More information at TakeBackYourMeds.org.

For more information or for free Mr. Yuk stickers, call the Household Hazards Line, 206-296-4692, or 1-888-TOXIC ED, Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or the Washington Poison Center, 1-800-222-1222, 24 hours a day. For a list of upcoming household hazardous waste collection events, visit http://www.lhwmp.org/home/NewsEvents/.

%d bloggers like this: