Tag Archives: household hazardous waste

Paint recycling bill being considered for a vote

PaintSideHouseWhat if there was a convenient way to deal with that oil-based paint that you’re currently taking to a hazardous waste facility or that latex paint that you’re drying out before putting in the garbage can?

Steve Dearborn, chief executive of Miller Paint, is advocating for that to happen. In a recent op-ed in The Olympian, he encourages the state legislature to pass the paint stewardship bill which would create a statewide paint collection program for the recycling or proper disposal of unwanted paint.

He cites among the benefits of such a program an end to the waste of leftover paint – a valuable resource for which a market exists. His Miller Paint customers each year purchase about 75,000 gallons of recycled latex paint made and sold in Oregon by Metro Paint.

He also calls attention to the benefits to the consumer and the environment. Residents and businesses with unused paint could, under this legislation, take it to a participating retail site. Such a program would help keep paint from being improperly disposed and possibly contaminating the land or waterways.

The bill, which was introduced in the legislature in January 2015, must come up for a vote in the House before the February 17, 2016 cut-off date.

Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County Releases 2014 Annual Report

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In 2014, the Program provided direct service to 90,000 people who visited our hazardous waste collection facilities, attended our trainings and had an Environmental Investigator visit their business.  It provided indirect service to over 200,000 people through our Website and Facebook page.  Read the full report.

The Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County is a multijurisdictional program whose mission is to reduce the threat posed by the production, use, storage and disposal of hazardous materials, thereby protecting public health and environmental quality. Program partners include the Seattle Public Utilities, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Public Health – Seattle & King County, and cities and tribes in King County.

 

Seven simple steps to prevent children’s poisonings

It’s hard to keep an eye on small children all the time, and young children put everything in their mouth. Follow these simple steps to reduce the chance of a poisoning in your home.

Step 1. Make green cleaners – Household cleaners are the third most common reason for accidental poisoning of children. Reduce your child’s exposure to toxins and make your own green cleaners (PDF).

Green clean kit

Build your own green cleaning kit

Step 2. Buy safer cleaners. If you don’t have the time or interest to make your own green cleaners, buy safer ones. How? Read the label. Look in the lower left-hand corner for the words CAUTION, WARNING, DANGER or POISON. Avoid products that say DANGER or POISON. Instead, buy products that have WARNING or CAUTION. Labels with WARNING carry a higher level of hazard than CAUTION. Sometimes two products that do the same thing have different warning labels like these products below – one says WARNING and the other says CAUTION. The product with the word CAUTION is safer than the product with WARNING. Buy the product with CAUTION.

Which product is safer_DangerCautionHighlight

Step 3. Store products safely – Help keep kids safer by storing hazardous products away from their reach. Lock cabinets or take a new look at where you keep your products.

Blond girl under kitchen sink

Step 4. Store and use hazardous products away from food – Children and adults can easily confuse edible products that are in look-a-like containers. Contact the Washington Poison Center 1-800-222-1222 for free help in case of exposure to poisonous, hazardous, or toxic substances.

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Step 5. Dispose of unwanted or expired medicines at one of these free, medicine take-back locations. Store the medicines you keep safely by locking them in a drawer, cabinet or medicine lock box.

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Step 6. Keep hazardous materials in their original containers – Unmarked and reused containers are easily confused with food – like these containers below that were reused to store waste diesel fuel. If you have to store a product outside of its original container, clearly label and safely dispose of it.

diesel fuel stored in juice bottles_Kitsap Co Solid Waste

(Photo courtesy of Kitsap County Solid Waste)

Step 7. Take unwanted household hazardous products to one of these disposal locations. It’s easy to do and it’s free! Watch this video to see how easy it is.

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Ciscoe Morris gets a surprise household hazardous waste inspection. What do they find?

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A surprise visit to an organic gardener’s home reveals some surprising places where household hazardous waste can be found! Find out how to identify household products that would need to be disposed as hazardous waste when no longer wanted — and where to take them for safe disposal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3zlUM7GrRAI

Wastemobile: Free household hazardous waste collection in Covington, March 15-17

Popular program in 24th year of service; year-round Auburn location continues

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, auto batteries, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items free of charge – as the service is paid for through garbage and sewer utility fees.

Wastemobile in Covington

The Wastemobile is coming!

Following its trip to Covington, the Wastemobile stops next on March 22-24, in Burien at the Fred Meyer, 14300 1st Ave. S.

Residents are helping safeguard the environment and public health by properly disposing of hazardous these materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills.

Created in 1989, the Wastemobile was the first program of its kind in the nation. It is operated by King County Solid Waste Division as part of the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program, and travels throughout the county from the spring through fall.

Since its inception, the Wastemobile has collected more than 16,000 tons of hazardous household waste from 450,000 customers.

For south King County residents, a convenient alternative to the Wastemobile is the household hazardous waste collection site in the northwest parking lot of The Outlet Collection (formerly the Auburn SuperMall), 1101 SuperMall Way, near Sports Authority. It operates every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Looking for reusable household products? The Wastemobile provides free products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents sign a release form prior to receiving the materials.

For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program’s Hazards Line at 206-296-4692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website at HazWasteHelp.org.

Wastemobile: Household hazardous waste disposal available year-round in King County

Drop off unwanted products before shopping the outlets

Make a clean start to the new year by safely disposing of old car batteries, oil, solvents and other household hazardous waste through a program that is available to all King County residents at no charge.

The Local Hazardous Waste Program in King County provides a year-round household hazardous waste service at the Auburn SuperMall, now renamed the Outlet Collection Seattle, at 1101 SuperMall Way, Auburn (next to Sports Authority).

Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday, the Auburn Wastemobile location offers the same outstanding service as the roving Wastemobile that travels to cities throughout King County from spring through fall.

The Wastemobile accepts a wide range of household hazardous waste, including oil-based paint, household cleaners, propane tanks and other hazardous household wastes.

By properly disposing of these wastes and keeping them out of the trash, sewers and storm drains, King County residents are helping safeguard the environment and reducing hazardous materials in their homes.

King County businesses with small amounts of hazardous waste can also take advantage of the Wastemobile service up to four times a year.

This program is not for businesses that regularly generate hazardous waste, have regular pick-ups by a contracted vendor, or generate extremely hazardous waste. More information is available by calling the Businesses Waste Line, 206-263-8899, or via email, business.waste@kingcounty.gov.

Looking for reusable household products? The Wastemobile provides free products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents must sign a release form prior to receiving those materials.

For more information about getting rid of household hazardous products, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, visit www.hazwastehelp.org, or call the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program’s Household Hazards Line at 206-296-4692 or 1-888-TOXIC ED (869-4233); TTY relay: 711, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays.

Wastemobile staff separate products

Wastemobile staff separate products for reuse or disposal

Spring Cleaning – Out with the old and in with the less toxic

Give your house a fresh start with a good spring cleaning.

Dig into those dark places and you’ll likely find some hazardous things. Stuff like bug sprays, automotive products, lawn and garden chemicals, burned out fluorescent light bulbs, drain and oven cleaners, paint strippers, home maintenance products and medicines.

 How can you tell the hazardous stuff?

Hazardous products say CAUTION, WARNING, DANGER, or POISON on the label and cannot go in the trash. Take them to the Hazardous Waste Collection sites…no charge. Shopping at the Auburn SuperMall? Save gas and combine trips – you can bring your hazardous waste there every weekend.  Call 1-888-TOXIC-ED for more information.

 Kids and chemicals don’t mix

Make sure hazardous products are stored safely away from children, who can confuse household hazardous products with food. The kids don’t read labels, and some containers and labels look fun and food-like. Reduce your stash of products and use safer alternatives as an easy way to make your home more kid-safe.

 What is safer?

Your favorite product may have a safer alternative. Read the label and buy products marked CAUTION or WARNING, not DANGER and POISON. Find some safer alternatives on the Household Hazardous Products List.

 What to do with old medicines?

Get rid of unwanted prescription drugs safely at locations listed in Take Back Your Meds. Protect your kids and pets from the medications you do keep; check out this video for tips on safe medicine storage.

 What about other stuff?

For all other stuff, like appliances, carpets, electronics, tires, and lawn waste, see What do I do With?….

 By Gail Gensler