Tag Archives: chemicals

Keep your family safer: get rid of unwanted hazardous products

 

You can’t watch children all the time.  So how can you keep them safer?ChildReachingCupboard

If you have unwanted hazardous products you could get them out of your home and away from curious hands.

How can you tell which products under the sink or in the closet are hazardous?

Look on the label.  If you see the words DANGER or POISON, that means the product is very harmful.

If you see the words CAUTION or WARNING, that means the products is somewhat harmful.

And if you don’t see CAUTION, WARNING, DANGER OR POISON on the product label, that means the product is safer to use.

So if you want to get rid of hazardous products you don’t want, what do you do?

Getting rid of hazardous products you no longer use can help keep you and your family safer.

El Nino winters can bring floods – take steps to prepare your home and business

Woman in flooded busienss_pomeroyohiobusiness2005CroppedCan you imagine standing in your home or business and seeing even a few inches of water? Is there anything you could do ahead of time to make this scene a little less devastating?

You might want to try some of this advice that is useful for both homes and businesses.

Have you ever been in flood?  Had you tried to prepare?  Were any of your efforts useful?

The Wastemobile is back!

Wastemobile 8

Early signs of Spring include crocuses, magnolia blossoms, early-blooming rhodies and …. the Wastemobile!

Bring the hazardous waste that you’ve accumulated over the long winter to the first Wastemobile of 2015 in Bothell, WA.

Find it in the Seattle Times parking lot at 19200 120th Ave NE between 10 to 5 from February 27th through March 1.

Think you don’t have hazardous waste in your house, garage or shed? Chances are you do. Hazardous waste includes burnt out fluorescent bulbs, CFL bulbs (twirly bulbs), most unwanted household cleaners, batteries, and much more. Find a complete list here.

This great service is free because it’s already been paid for in your utility bill.

Two free workshops on Chemical Safety in Schools in early December

Dave Waddell in the lab

You and your colleagues are invited to attend to attend two free workshops on Chemical Safety in Schools:

Initial Chemical Hygiene Training

Tuesday, December 2, from 8:30 -11:30 am

South Seattle College

6000 16th Avenue SW, Seattle, WA 98106

Advanced Hygiene/Spill Response Training

Thursday, December 4, from 1:15 – 4:30 pm

Center School (at Seattle Center)

305 Harrison St. Seattle, WA 98109

Dave Waddell’s presentations are highly visual and entertaining. He is a school chemical safety expert and developer of the on-line School Chemicals Database.

You will:

  • Learn proper chemical storage and handling techniques.
  • See spill response procedures.
  • Understand how to dispose laboratory wastes.
  • Hear about mandatory upcoming chemical hazard trainings.
  • Practice identifying chemicals of concern.
  • Get to ask your questions.

Register now by emailing the following information to dave.waddell@kingcounty.gov

  • Your name
  • Your school
  • Your position
  • Let Dave know if you are interested in clock hours.

Hidden Hazards in the Arts – Free Workshop for Artists

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Find out how to identify safer chemicals, store art supplies safely and dispose of waste properly at a free

Hidden Hazards in the Arts workshop.

“We are here to help artists take out some of the risks of handling these chemicals, particularly since many of them have home studios.  We want to help artists protect their health and their families,” said Donna Galstad, a workshop presenter with the LHWMP Art Hazards project.

“I attended a Hidden Hazards in the Arts workshop, and there was so much information related to my personal art process and the materials I use —crucial new information to avoid exposure to toxins in the studio,” said Mark Calderon, a Seattle sculptor.

More information and register for this free workshop:

  • Tuesday, September 16
  • 6:30pm- 8:30pm
  • Shoreline City Hall – third floor classrooms
  • 17544 Midvale Ave N
  • Shoreline, WA 98133

Sponsored by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County and the Shoreline-Lake Forest Park Arts Council.

Kids and chemicals don’t mix

Keep kids safe this summer by properly storing hazardous household products

Children are naturally curious and explore their homes where many hazardous but common household products are kept. The third most-common call to the Washington Poison Center is about accidental exposure to cleaning products.  

“Even the best parent can’t supervise a child all the time and easy-to-do prevention can make your home a safe place for your child to explore,” said Dr. Beth Ebel, director of Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Washington. 

The Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County has assembled easy tips for a safer home this summer. Find the complete list at www.hazwastehelp.org/hazardsinyourhome

Top safety tips include: 

  • Store products safely. Lock cabinets, or take a new look at where you keep cleaners, air fresheners, or medicines.
  • Keep hazardous products in their original containers. The labels have the product information on them, the hazards and first aid – all of this is critical information if your child is exposed to products. Even adults can mistake toxics for food if cleaning products, automotive fluids or other hazardous items are not stored in their original containers.
  • Get rid of unwanted hazardous products at no charge. Disposal is free at household hazardous waste disposal facilities, including the Wastemobile. A list of locations is at http://www.hazwastehelp.org.
  • Clean out your medicine cabinet and store medicines safely. Safely dispose of medicines that are unwanted or expired – use a no cost medicine take-back program at a drop-off location. Store medicines safely by keeping them out of reach – lock them in a drawer, cabinet or medicine lock box. More information at TakeBackYourMeds.org.

For more information or for free Mr. Yuk stickers, call the Household Hazards Line, 206-296-4692, or 1-888-TOXIC ED, Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or the Washington Poison Center, 1-800-222-1222, 24 hours a day. For a list of upcoming household hazardous waste collection events, visit http://www.lhwmp.org/home/NewsEvents/.

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