Help Us Celebrate the Groundbreaking Work of Healthier Nail Salons

NailGardenLiz This weekend Seattle will celebrate the first certified Healthy Nail Salon – the Nail Garden in the Green Lake neighborhood, located at 7900 E. Greenlake Dr. N, #109, Seattle, WA 98103. The celebration starts at 11 am and goes until 2 pm. Be one of the first 30 visitors and receive a bottle of “3-free” polish (no toluene, formaldehyde or dibutyl phthalate) with this coupon. What’s special about Nail Garden that makes it a “certified” healthy nail salon? Those of us who have braved strong solvent odors for a manicure or pedicure will appreciate that this salon has a ventilation system that diverts the odors outside where they are quickly dissipated. This benefits not only the customers but the nail technicians who spend up to 8 to 10 hours a day breathing the vapors. It is not uncommon for nail technicians to experience dizziness, nausea and headaches. Long-term exposure can cause asthma, liver and kidney issues and memory problems. Most nail technicians are Vietnamese and have limited English proficiency. Like most of us, many are not aware of the problems exposure to these chemicals may cause. The Healthy Nail Salon project in King County partnered with salons to help them improve their ventilation systems, find safer chemicals and personal protective equipment. It also created a recognition program for those salons that safely handle, store and dispose of their chemicals. Come celebrate with Nail Garden this Saturday from 11 am to 2:00 pm. The celebration is more than just this nail salon’s commitment to protecting the health of their employees. It’s also a celebration of the groundbreaking work the Healthy Nail Salon project is doing in King County. The Healthy Nail Salon project is a part of the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program in King County.

Celebrate Earth Day and make that trip

It may not seem that the simple act of gathering your unwanted household hazardous waste and making a trip to the disposal facility will “save the Earth”, but many small, individual actions add up to big results.

Thirty-two million pounds – that’s the amount of household hazardous waste people brought to the Wastemobile in 25 years. This came from individuals gathering waste from under their sink or off the shelf in their garage and making a trip to a disposal site.

Hazardous waste includes many things most of us wouldn’t consider hazardous:

  • fluorescent light bulbs and tubes (they contain toxic mercury)
  • any household cleaner with the words CAUTION, WARNING, DANGER or POISON on the label (that’s most of them);
  • the can of oil-based paint you didn’t use up completely;
  • household batteries (they contain lead) – yes, even the ones from your remote control units.

Will you join us and make that trip this spring?  Locations. List of what you can bring.

WM Contest winner 2_2014

Wastemobile: Household hazardous waste collection comes to Vashon, April 17-19

Find upcoming collections and convenient, permanent disposal sites

Vashon-Maury residents can safely dispose of old car batteries, oil, paint thinner and many other household hazardous items at no cost when the Wastemobile travels to Vashon Island, April 17-19.

The Wastemobile will be at the Tjomsland Gravel Pit, 17001 107th Ave. SW, Vashon, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, lamps, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items without a charge. The service is pre-paid through garbage and sewer utility fees.

The Wastemobile goes to Des Moines next

Following its stop on Vashon, the Wastemobile will travel to Des Moines, April 24-26 for a household hazardous waste collection event at the Des Moines Marina, 22307 Dock St., Des Moines.

About the Wastemobile

Created in 1989, the Wastemobile was the first traveling hazardous waste disposal program in the nation. It is operated by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program and goes throughout the county from the spring through fall.

Residents help protect the environment and public health by safely disposing of the hazardous materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills. Since first hitting the road, the Wastemobile has collected more than 16,000 tons of hazardous household waste from more than 450,000 customers.

The Wastemobile is now part of LightRecycle Washington, a program to safely collect fluorescent tubes and bulbs that contain mercury. The program is funded through an environmental handling charge that is included in the retail price of these types of lights.

The Wastemobile also provides free reusable products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents must sign a release form prior to receiving the materials.

More disposal solutions: Visit the permanent collection site

For south King County residents, the Auburn Wastemobile is a convenient alternative for disposing of household hazardous waste. It is located in the northwest parking lot of The Outlet Collection (formerly the Auburn SuperMall), 1101 Outlet Collection Dr., SW, near Sports Authority. It operates every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Qualifying businesses can also use the no-cost disposal services. Call 206-263-8899 or find details at hazwastehelp.org.

For more information

For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Hazards Line at 206-296-4692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website.

The Wastemobile is one of the services provided by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program through a partnership of more than 40 city, county and tribal governments working together in King County to reduce threats posed from hazardous materials and wastes.

Wastemobile: Household hazardous waste collection comes to Redmond, April 3-5

Find upcoming collections and convenient, permanent disposal sites

All King County and city residents can safely dispose of old car batteries, oil, paint thinner and many other household hazardous items at no cost when the Wastemobile travels to Redmond, April 3-5.

The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of The Home Depot, 17777 NE 76th St., Redmond, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, lamps, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items without a charge. The service is pre-paid through garbage and sewer utility fees.

The Wastemobile goes to Vashon next

Following its stop in Redmond, the Wastemobile will travel to Vashon for a household hazardous waste collection event April 17-19 at the Tjomsland Gravel Pit, 17001 107th Ave. SW, Vashon.

About the Wastemobile

Created in 1989, the Wastemobile was the first traveling hazardous waste disposal program in the nation. It is operated by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program and goes throughout the county from the spring through fall.

Residents help protect the environment and public health by safely disposing of the hazardous materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills. Since first hitting the road, the Wastemobile has collected more than 16,000 tons of hazardous household waste from more than 450,000 customers.

The Wastemobile is now part of LightRecycle Washington, a program to safely collect fluorescent tubes and bulbs that contain mercury. The program is funded through an environmental handling charge that is included in the retail price of these types of lights.

The Wastemobile also provides free reusable products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents must sign a release form prior to receiving the materials.

More disposal solutions: Visit the permanent collection site

For south King County residents, the Auburn Wastemobile is a convenient alternative for disposing of household hazardous waste. It is located in the northwest parking lot of The Outlet Collection (formerly the Auburn SuperMall), 1101 Outlet Collection Dr., SW, near Sports Authority. It operates every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Qualifying businesses can also use the no-cost disposal services. Call 206-263-8899 or find details at hazwastehelp.org.

For more information

For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Hazards Line at 206-296-4692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website.

The Wastemobile is one of the services provided by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program through a partnership of more than 40 city, county and tribal governments working together in King County to reduce threats posed from hazardous materials and wastes.

Washington State Paint Recycling Bill Passes the House!

The paint recycling bill passed a House floor vote by 60-38 on March 5th!

Next step: it moves to the Senate for consideration.

Here are three good reasons we support this legislation:

(1)

Painter_House_testifying_Feb2015

From the owner of Flying Colors Painting Company in Olympia

I’m a house painter in Olympia. I’m here because I see [left over paint cans] in every single house. It is impossible to leave a job without leaving the touch-up paint; there is always leftover paint. … I would love it. Our customers would love it, if something simple and easy like this [paint recycling program] happened. – Dustin Wilson, Feb 5 House bill hearing.

(2)

Miller Paint_testimony_Feb5-2015-cropped

From the CEO of Miller Paint Company with take-back locations for leftover paint in other states.

We … just sold our 300,000th gallon of recycled paint [paint made from leftover, take back paint]. [That’s about] 1.5 million containers that are about 20% full, are not going to the landfill. If the state of Washington adopts this bill, Miller Paint would be interested in becoming a processor [in Washington]; it would add probably 25 to 30 jobs; it would keep all that recycling within the state and add jobs here in the state of Washington.  –Steve Dearborn, CEO of Miller Paint Company Feb. 5 House bill hearing

(3)

This proposed recycling program takes a different approach from most other recycling programs because the paint industry would lead it – not the government.

If it passes in the Senate, it would become part of a uniform system operating in the U.S. for the proper recycling, reuse and disposal of leftover paint. Eight other states, including Oregon, have passed similar legislation initiated by the paint industry.

The Wastemobile is back!

Wastemobile 8

Early signs of Spring include crocuses, magnolia blossoms, early-blooming rhodies and …. the Wastemobile!

Bring the hazardous waste that you’ve accumulated over the long winter to the first Wastemobile of 2015 in Bothell, WA.

Find it in the Seattle Times parking lot at 19200 120th Ave NE between 10 to 5 from February 27th through March 1.

Think you don’t have hazardous waste in your house, garage or shed? Chances are you do. Hazardous waste includes burnt out fluorescent bulbs, CFL bulbs (twirly bulbs), most unwanted household cleaners, batteries, and much more. Find a complete list here.

This great service is free because it’s already been paid for in your utility bill.

A recycling paint program for Washington State?

paint cans on shelves

Do you have leftover paint sitting in your shed or garage that you don’t know what to do with? Well, a solution may be on the horizon.

The State legislature is considering paint recycling legislation in Washington State (HB 1571-S/SB 5926) that would allow people to return their unused latex and oil-based paint to participating Household Hazardous Waste facilities or retail locations. Their paint would then be recycled, reused or managed responsibly.

Household hazardous waste facilities used to take leftover paint, but newer latex paint is no longer “hazardous” so you can harden it with kitty litter and throw it in the garbage.

Unfortunately, this method is not feasible for some King County residents. “You’re supposed to put [leftover paint] on your deck or in your garage and let it dry or mix it with kitty litter. I can’t do that – I live in a condo! … If I could take [my leftover paint] back somewhere and let someone else use it, that would be great!” said Nora Tablor, in an interview last month with Gary Chitham, King 5 News.  http://kng5.tv/1wBPJeO

The Paint Stewardship Bill is expected to increase the amount of leftover paint collected in Washington by 87%, creating new opportunities for local businesses to collect, transport, recycle and dispose of leftover paint.

Sounds like a good idea to us.

More on why Washington State would benefit from a statewide recycling law.

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