Motorists: Fix leaks so you ‘Don’t Drip and Drive’

Drip and drive coupon

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Free visual leak inspections, repair discount

Motorists in King County can find an affordable fix and keep pollutants out of Puget Sound so that they “Don’t Drip and Drive.”

Every year, more than 7 million quarts of motor oil drips out of vehicles and onto streets and parking lots, much of it ending up in streams, lakes and Puget Sound.

The Don’t Drip and Drive campaign and participating repair shops across western Washington are offering car owners a free visual leak inspection – a diagnostic service valued at up to $80 – available now through September.

If the inspection reveals a problem, the car owner will receive a coupon for 10 percent off service to fix the problem (up to $50). Repair coupons expire Sept. 30, 2014. Find a list of participating locations, help to self-diagnose your leak, and print out a coupon at Don’t Drip and Drive.

“The main reason we have been participating in ‘Don’t Drip and Drive’ is that we are aware that fluids do leak from a surprising number of vehicles,” said Mike Lenci of Bellevue Auto Service & Electric, Inc., an EnviroStars-certified business. “We want to help to repair these leaks and give the motorist a substantial discount on the repair as well to help keep our water clean.”

Studies show that two-thirds of drivers will fix a leak within three months of finding it.

You can keep your car running great while protecting our local waters.

 

Redmond hosts Wastemobile July 18 – 20, offering free household hazardous waste.

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The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of the Home Depot, 17777 NE 76th St., Redmond, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. All King County and city residents as well as qualified businesses in King County can safely dispose of old car batteries, oil, paint thinner and many other hazardous items at no cost. The service is already paid for it in your garbage and sewer utility fees. Households can bring the wastes listed here http://www.lhwmp.org/home/HHW/whattobring.aspx. Find out if your business qualifies http://www.lhwmp.org/home/BHW/sqg.aspx or call 206-296-4692.

After Redmond, the Wastemobile goes to Bothell

Following Redmond, the Wastemobile travels north to Bothell for an Aug. 1-3 household hazardous waste collection event in the parking lot of the Seattle Times building, 19200 120th Ave. NE, Bothell.

About the Wastemobile

Celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2014, the Wastemobile was the first traveling hazardous waste disposal program in the nation. It is operated by the Local Hazardous Waste Management Program and it goes throughout the county from spring through fall.

Residents help protect the environment and public health by safely disposing of the hazardous materials and keeping them out of drains and landfills.

During the past quarter century, the Wastemobile has collected more than 16,000 tons of hazardous household waste from 450,000 customers.

The Wastemobile also provides free reusable products to the public, such as oil-based paint, stain and primer, plus wood care and cleaning products. These products are subject to availability, and residents must sign a release form prior to receiving the materials.

More disposal solutions: Visit the permanent collection site

For south King County residents, the Auburn Wastemobile, is a convenient alternative for disposing of household hazardous waste. It is located in the northwest parking lot of The Outlet Collection (formerly the Auburn SuperMall), 1101 Outlet Collection Dr., SW, near Sports Authority. It operates every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Wastemobile coming to Snoqualmie July 11-13, offers free household hazardous waste disposal

All King County and city residents can safely dispose of old car batteries, oil, paint thinner and many other household hazardous items at no cost when the Wastemobile makes its one and only stop this year in Snoqualmie, July 11-13.

The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of Snoqualmie Elementary School, 39801 SE Park St., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, auto batteries, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items without a charge. The service is pre-paid through garbage and sewer utility fees.

For more information about disposal, including acceptable materials and quantity limits, call the Hazards Line at 206-296-4692, Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., except holidays. Recorded information is available after hours, or by visiting the Wastemobile website at www.HazWasteHelp.org

Wastemobile staff at work

A beautiful day to get rid of hazardous products!

 

The Wastemobile goes to Redmond next

Following its stop in Snoqualmie, the Wastemobile travels to Redmond for a household hazardous waste collection event July 18-20 in the parking lot of the Home Depot, 17777 NE 76th St.

Pregnant and breastfeeding women encouraged to eat more fish that is lower in mercury

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The FDA and EPA recently issued draft advice on how much fish is safe to eat. They concluded that pregnant and breastfeeding women, those who might become pregnant, and young children should eat more fish that is lower in mercury.

“For years many women have limited or avoided eating fish during pregnancy or feeding fish to their young children,” said Stephen Ostroff, M.D., the FDA’s acting chief scientist. “But emerging science now tells us that limiting or avoiding fish during pregnancy and early childhood can mean missing out on important nutrients that can have a positive impact on growth and development as well as on general health.”

Fish that is lower in mercury includes shrimp, pollock, salmon, canned light tuna, tilapia, catfish and cod. The Washington Department of Health has a handy Healthy Fish Guide to help you choose fish that is low in mercury.

Before issuing the final advice, EPA and FDA will consider public comments. They also intend to conduct a series of focus groups.

Read the full press release at http://1.usa.gov/1u1wNkx .

Wastemobile coming to Bothell June 27-29, offers free household hazardous waste disposal

All King County and city residents can safely dispose of old car batteries, oil, paint thinner and many other household hazardous items at no cost when the Wastemobile makes its third stop of the year in Bothell, June 27-29.

The Wastemobile will be in the parking lot of the Seattle Times building, 19200 120th Ave. NE, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

Residents can drop off household hazardous waste items including pesticides, oil-based paints, automotive products (oil, antifreeze, auto batteries, etc.), fluorescent bulbs/tubes and other items without a charge. The service is pre-paid through garbage and sewer utility fees.

The Wastemobile goes to Snoqualmie next

Following its stop in Bothell, the Wastemobile travels to Snoqualmie for a household hazardous waste collection event July 11-13 in the parking lot of Snoqualmie Elementary School, 39801 SE Park St.Wastemobile 3

Free Art Hazards Presentation at Kenmore Art Show

Hidden Hazards in the Arts workshop set for June 29.

Upcoming workshop on Art Safety.

Date: Sunday, June 29

Time: 5:00 to 7:00 PM

Location: Bastyr University Auditorium.

This engaging and informative workshop will provide you with an understanding of the ways art chemicals can harm you and how you can reduce those harmful exposures. It’s also a chance for you to get answers to questions about the specific circumstances in your practice and your studio from an expert in this field.

For more information, go to http://www.artsofkenmore.org/

Presenter Dave Waddell is an environmental investigator and chemical hazards specialist. Dave is the creator and coordinator of King County’s Art Hazards Project.
artist studio

Free workshop: Reducing Reproductive Risks to Artists

‘Hidden Hazards in the Arts’ workshop set for June 19 in Seattle

Upcoming workshop – Reducing Risks of Reproductive Harm to Artists

Date: June 19, 2014
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Artspace Hiawatha Lofts, 843 Hiawatha Place S., Seattle 98144.

Under ordinary circumstances it’s challenging for couples to produce a healthy baby:

  • 10 percent of women are infertile
  • 10 percent of men are too
  • 3 percent of newborns have birth defects
  • Up to 40% of pregnancies are unsuccessful, depending on the mother’s age at conception

art_hazard_reproductivehealth

Then add in exposures to toxic art materials like resins, glues, solvents and metals that have been linked to problems: reduced fertility, miscarriages, birth defects, low birth weight, childhood cancer and developmental disorders.

Learn how to reduce reproductive risks from toxic chemicals.

Join other artists and designers at a free lecture and discussion on Reproductive Hazards in the Arts. Refreshments will be provided! RSVP to dave.waddell@kingcounty.gov or 206-263-3069.
Brought to you by The Art Hazards Project.

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